7 Useful Websites for Teaching Kids

7 Useful Websites for Teaching Kids

Being a teacher is never boring, especially when one changes age groups they have got used to – for a while now I’ve been more focused on teaching young learners which is quite an adventure. While my main interest lies with Disney English I try to include some magic into regular courses – and it’s easy to bring a wee bit of magic by using IWB in the classroom, provided the materials you want to share are carefully selected. When teaching children, it’s important to use technology responsibly – we may watch a video as an encouragement, but let’s not spend the whole lesson on using IWB tools.

I am absolutely sure you can recommend a nice collection of websites and applications useful for YL teachers, but I also want to share my top seven:

iSLCollective

You probably know this website as it’s full of goodies – printables, of course, but also video materials and more. You can find more than 200 videos with lesson ideas for children here, and fun activities with songs and nursery rhymes here. I don’t think you’ll ever get bored with this website, a lot of materials that you can use the moment you enter your classroom and see your students somewhat less lively than usual.

twinkl

I have already written about twinkl here, here and here but I still find it one of the best sources of inspirations and classroom help (speaking activity based on a photo of benches? why not!). Why, if I could I’d gladly take a whole course of twinkl-inspired classes! You can find something even for the youngest babies, and the best thing about it is that you can use twinkl to introduce CLIL classes from the very beginning of kids’ education.

LearnEnglish Kids

I love websites by the British Council – and the one dedicated for kids is just adorable. Visually child-friendly, but easy to navigate for a teacher. You can find nice songs (for example about superheroes) along with matching activities and games, various exercises etc. But what I really love about this site is the speaking part, where children supported by their parents or teachers can practise proper pronunciation. I also appreciate the fact that there are guidelines for parents who want to practise with their children but don’t really know where to start.

Fun English Games

I find this website a charming mix of some old-fashioned activities along with interactive games. You may find lovely tongue twisters here and then move to the alphabet game. The only drawback is that it takes a while before the page loads, so you must be prepared for this – better have it ready before you start your class! You can pick a letter matching game for those who start learning their letters or play a poetry game with the older students.

ESLGames+

This website is a lifesaver for all those teachers who either feel Mondayish or simply still think of their holidays. You enter the classroom, find a topic your class is about and boom! – you can choose a video, a game (I appreciate games divided into lower and higher classrooms) or simply choose a topic (like school supplies) and see what options the site gives you. There is no place for boredom and I’m sure your students will love the games.

Super Simple

If you have ever taught kids – or talked to anyone who taught kids – you must’ve heard of Baby Shark (and its variations). If not – welcome to Super Simple, the world of songs, videos and lessons for the youngest students. Starting with the ABC, up until short videos (Milo’s Monster School Vlog is just adorable) – you can be sure your students will have a lot of fun.

Yeah, you too. Only be careful, as Baby Shark will never leave your mind. You have been warned.

Teach Children ESL

You may be surprised why I decided to include this website as it’s not so IWB-oriented as the previous ones. However, what I love about this page is the variety of games for different holidays, song activities and other awesome projects (I love classroom dice!). And with technology one thing is certain – you need to have Plan B. In an emergency situation – you know, what to do: prepare a nice activity and hope for the best, but be prepared for the worst.

I hope I managed to show you some websites you haven’t used before, but if you know other useful pages please, leave me a comment, I’ll be more than happy to try something new!

Enjoy!

Advertisements

Role-Playing Teaching (Part 10:Why RPGs Rock in the Classroom)

Role-Playing Teaching (1)

So far I’ve written 9 articles in my Role-Playing Teaching series and I’ve just realised I didn’t write anything about why RPGs are so cool when it comes to teaching! So here we are, a list of seven main reasons you should take your class into one of the Never-Never worlds.

1. Communication

I wrote about it in Character Creation part – with RPGs you start communicating before you even start playing. You create your character, you establish relationships with other players and then you spend hours talking, communicating, arguing, convincing and making people see your point of view. You don’t practice communication, you simply communicate and learn on the way, that if you speak to a police officer the way you talk with your best buddy, it may affect the communication. Which is a lesson worth learning before you meet an actual police officer and start talking rubbish…

2. Fun

I know some people believe proper learning requires solemn approach, study books and a lot of copies with grammar drills. I agree with this perspective when it comes to introducing grammar constructions (surprisingly, I guess that in order to understand the Reported Speech you need to produce a certain amount of drills) – but my primary goal in teaching is fun; this is the main reason I teach, honestly. And when you can teach, play and have fun at the same time – how could I resist the temptation?

3. Friendship

For years I’ve been attending fantasy fans’ conventions and spent hours talking about RPGs, systems, world, adventures and sessions – if you’re a teacher, imagine attending a teachers’ conference and discussing with a random teacher of another subject and from another part of your country your issues with a particular group of students: it doesn’t sound probable, right? Yet that’s what RPGs fans do, we share our adventures, epic stories and even equally epic dice rolls! Why? Because RPGs connect people – you start talking about the last edition of Warhammer, go for a pint, it turns out you have some common interests apart from RPGs, then you meet more people like this, have a great time, you meet them again on another convention and boom! suddenly you have friends all over the country.

Very useful from a tourist’s point of view.

4. Research

I remember, when we started playing my presently favourite system (Delta Green) we did quite a lot of research on American governmental organisations (as you usually play an FBI agent, or a CDC official, or maybe even an NRA representative, and you even might playing a CIA agent if you’re risky enough). Likewise, when we started playing Call of Cthulhu┬áin 1920, we had to do some research on laws, politics, pop-culture, social code etc. I’m planning to take my teen students on the journey to the USA in the 1920s and that will require them to do some reading and learn things they otherwise wouldn’t even bother to think about.

5. Memories

Imagine meeting people after five years and trying to find a common topic after you’re done with the small talks. Sometimes it causes awkward silence, but never for the RPGs fans! Our chats are full of “do you remember” – “do you remember when you killed that giant demonic slug with one hit?” (don’t ask…) or “do you remember when we had to solve the case of the missing hen?” (4 hours playing). Taking part in various “after years” meetings I must say the RPG-related ones are the liveliest and the funniest. No English course will give you memories similar to those when you go on an adventure with a group of people who ultimately become your friends.

6. Team building

I live in Poland. Poland is a lovely country but the social trust is terribly low. As a nation, we don’t really trust people – and something I’ve observed and been told when I worked abroad is that we’re not really team players. And that’s true, even when you look at the way we’re working, starting from primary school. Team-work is important, being teachers we know that collaboration and cooperation are vital. Now, RPGs teach you team building. You have to work as a team, otherwise you won’t complete the quest. Communication, negotiation and the awesome ability of taking the blame sometimes and not blaming others – you learn it all here.

7. Teacher’s laziness

I know there are hard-working teachers who enjoy lesson-prep, copying materials and cutting-out visuals. Regretfully, I am not one of them. If you read my blog, you probably know the best lesson for me is when my students do the work and I am a mere counsellor. RPGs work like that – you prepare an adventure, define the area of the language your students are going to practise (“today we focus on the passive”) and make notes of new vocabulary they will want to revise after the session… and then you basically have fun! Especially when you see your students having a blast, not even realising they’re learning the language.

To be sure, I could give you more examples of RPGs being awesome in your class – and I probably will, as this year I’m starting a mini-course of English based solely on RPGs. Adventures galore, a group of teenagers, Great Cthulhu and English – what can possibly go wrong?

Well, we’re about to see quite soon…